Commission launches EIC prize for early warning system for epidemics

Commission launches EIC prize for early warning system for epidemics
The commission has today (26 April) launched a prize to find the best solution for setting up an early warning system for epidemics.

The European Commission launched a €5m prize for the best solution for a scalable, reliable and cost-effective early warning system for epidemics.

The commission has today (26 April) launched a prize to find the best solution for setting up an early warning system for epidemics. It is one of six European Innovation Council (EIC) Horizon Prizes, which are part of the European Innovation Council pilot run under Horizon 2020, the EU’s Research and Innovation Framework Programme.

The winning solution will provide an early warning capability to support existing elimination efforts and help mitigate the impact of infectious diseases on global scales.

It will be expected to use the Copernicus and GEOSS earth observation data as the system will be able to forecast and monitor outbreaks of vector-borne diseases such as:

  • Malaria;
  • Zika virus;
  • Dengue; and
  • Yellow fever.

The competition was launched by Carlos Moedas, Commissioner for Research, Science and Innovation, who said: “Every year there is more than one million deaths from vector-borne diseases globally. Their societal impact is significant, often causing disability, stigma and exacerbating poverty. for innovators to find solutions help That future outbreaks and prevent prevention Improve life quality.”

Using big data in health

As part of the Digital Single Market strategy, the commission presented yesterday initiatives on digitising the healthcare system. They focus on securing citizens’ access to their healthcare data and the possibility to share it across borders.

The use of larger data enables a more personalised diagnosis and medical treatment, as well as improves the research and anticipation of epidemics. In this way, the Commission promotes the transformation of healthcare and puts people at the centre of it.

What are vector-borne diseases?

Vector-borne diseases are caused by viruses, bacteria and parasites transmitted via living organisms such as insects.  These diseases account for more than 17% of all infectious diseases.

Globalisation of travel and trade, unplanned urbanisation and environmental challenges such as climate change are having a significant impact on disease transmission.

Laboratory Supplies Directory - Now Live

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here